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Exoskeletal Surface of a Larval Staged Antlion

Exoskeletal Surface of a Larval Staged Antlion

Under a moderate magnification of 340X, this digitally-colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) depicted the exoskeletal surface of a larval staged antlion, sometimes referred to as a “doodlebug”, because of the trails it leaves in the soft sand as it hunts for prey. This arthropod, i.e., jointed legs, undergoes dramatic morphologic changes when it metamorphoses into a beautiful flying antlion lacewing. In this particular view, the distal end of one of the larva’s extremities is highlighted, revealing the claw it uses to grasp objects it encounters in its environment, including sand.

Ultrastructural Morphology on the Head Region of a Larval Antlion

Ultrastructural Morphology on the Head Region of a Larval Antlion

Ultrastructural Morphology on the Head Region of a Larval Antlion

Under a magnification of 1244X, this scanning electron micrograph (SEM) depicted some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed on the head region of a larval antlion, surrounding the region of its right compound eye. This larva is sometimes referred to as a “doodlebug”, because of the trails it leaves in the soft sand as it hunts for prey. This arthropod, i.e., jointed legs, undergoes dramatic morphologic changes when it metamorphoses into a beautiful flying antlion lacewing. Note the particulate debris dispersed over the exoskeletal surface, which represents sand, and other constituents of the antlion’s natural environment.

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Doodlebug (uncolorized)

Doodlebug (uncolorized)

Under a very low magnification of 13X, this scanning electron micrograph (SEM) depicted the entire ventral surface of a larval-staged antlion, sometime referred to as a “doodlebug”, because of the trails it leaves in the soft sand as it hunts for prey. This arthropod, i.e., jointed legs, undergoes dramatic morphologic changes when it metamorphoses into a beautiful flying antlion lacewing.

Doodlebug

Doodlebug

Doodlebug

Under a very low magnification of 13X, this digitally-colorized scanning electron micrograph depicted the entire ventral surface of the larval staged antlion, sometime referred to as a “doodlebugs”, because of the trails they leave in the soft sand as they hunt for prey. These arthropods, i.e., jointed legs, undergo dramatic morphologic changes when it metamorphoses into a beautiful flying antlion lacewing.

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Ultrastructural Morphology Displayed on the Ventral Surface of a Bedbug (Cimex lectularius)

Ventral Surface of a Bedbug (Cimex lectularius)

This digitally-colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) revealed some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed on the ventral surface of a bedbug, Cimex lectularius. From this view, at the top, you can see the insect’s skin piercing mouthparts it uses to obtain its blood meal, as well as a number of its disarticulated six jointed legs. You’ll also notice a beautiful diaphanous structure at the bottom of the image. It is speculated that this wondrous ultrastructural organ is most probably a scent gland, or related to the dissemination of scent, which may be pheromonal in nature. A further dissection of this, and the adjacent mesothoracic region, could possibly reveal an internalized aspect of this organ, which would be glandular in nature, and actually involved in the production of the aromatic chemical.

Ultrastructural Morphology Displayed on the Ventral Surface of a Bedbug (Cimex lectularius)

Ultrastructural Morphology Displayed on the Ventral Surface of a Bedbug (Cimex lectularius)

Ultrastructural Morphology Displayed on the Ventral Surface of a Bedbug (Cimex lectularius)

This digitally-colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) revealed some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed on the ventral surface of a bedbug, Cimex lectularius. From this view, at the top, you can see the insect’s skin piercing mouthparts it uses to obtain its blood meal, as well as a number of its disarticulated six jointed legs. You’ll also notice a beautiful diaphanous structure at the bottom of the image. It is speculated that this wondrous ultrastructural organ is most probably a scent gland, or related to the dissemination of scent, which may be pheromonal in nature. A further dissection of this, and the adjacent mesothoracic region, could possibly reveal an internalized aspect of this organ, which would be glandular in nature, and actually involved in the production of the aromatic chemical.

Ultrastructural Morphology Displayed on the Ventral Surface of a bedbug (Cimex lectularius)

Ultrastructural Morphology Displayed on the Ventral Surface of a bedbug (Cimex lectularius)

Ultrastructural Morphology Displayed on the Ventral Surface of a bedbug (Cimex lectularius)

This digitally-colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) revealed some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed on the ventral surface of a bedbug, Cimex lectularius. From this view, at the top, you can see the insect’s skin piercing mouthparts it uses to obtain its blood meal, as well as a number of its disarticulated six jointed legs. You’ll also notice a beautiful diaphanous structure at the bottom of the image. It is speculated that this wondrous ultrastructural organ is most probably a scent gland, or related to the dissemination of scent, which may be pheromonal in nature. A further dissection of this, and the adjacent mesothoracic region, could possibly reveal an internalized aspect of this organ, which would be glandular in nature, and actually involved in the production of the aromatic chemical.

Hong Kong Flu Virus Virions (H3N2 Subtype)

Hong Kong Flu Virus Virions (H3N2 Subtype)

Hong Kong Flu Virus Virions (H3N2 Subtype)

(All Images are for Editorial Use Only)

This negatively-stained transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealed the presence of a number of Hong Kong flu virus virions, the H3N2 subtype of the influenza A virus. This virus is a Orthomyxoviridae virus family member, and was responsible for the flu pandemic of 1968-1969, which infected an estimated 50,000,000 people in the United States, killing 33,000. Note the proteinaceous coat, or capsid, surroundind each virion, and the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase spikes, which differ in terms of their molecular make-up from strain to strain.

There are many different subtypes of type A influenza viruses. These subtypes differ because of changes in certain proteins on the surface of the influenza A virus (hemagglutinin [HA] and neuraminidase [NA] proteins). There are 16 known HA subtypes and 9 known NA subtypes of influenza A viruses. Many different combinations of HA and NA proteins are possible. Each combination represents a different subtype. All known subtypes of influenza A viruses can be found in birds.